Get In With Your Skin Gardens Dermatology Esthetic Blog
By contactus@gardensdermatology.com
January 05, 2021
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Taking care of your hands during the pandemic

 

Proper handwashing is an essential. You’ve been washing your hands more this year to keep yourself free of germs and bacteria. However, you may have noticed your hands are dryer than usual. While frequent handwashing is one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of infections, it can also cause dryness and chapped skin, early wrinkles, rashes, and other skin-related issues. People who have pre-existing skin conditions, like eczema, are at risk of developing more severe symptoms.

 

As recently mentioned by Harvard Health Publishing, when your skin is intact, it serves as a protective barrier. When the top layer is exposed to hot water, oil stripping soaps and drying alcohol found in some hand sanitizers can break down the compounds and healthy fatty acids. The result is an impaired barrier, leading to irritation, discomfort, cracks or breaks in the skin, and increased risk of infection. 

 

According to the American Academy of Dermatology Association, dry skin increases your chances of picking up germs. Moisturized skin can better protect you because of the natural oils and wax it holds. When washing your hands or using sanitizer, it’s essential to follow-up with a moisturizer to prevent excess dryness. 

 

Here are some ways to keep your hands clean, healthy, and moisturized while frequently washing.

 

Wash with cool, lukewarm, or warm water. Hot water can dry your skin out because it strips away natural oils.  You can use a moisturizing cleanser to help prevent dryness.  Dr. Michael Borenstein at Gardens Dermatology recommends using a mild, fragrance-free soap if you have sensitive skin, eczema, or other related issues. Those who prefer natural or organic ingredients, look for soaps containing shea butter, avocado oil, coconut oil, or jojoba oil. 

 

If you cannot wash your hands as frequently, keep an alcohol-based (60% ethanol or 70% isopropanol alcohol) sanitizer available. After applying the sanitizer, wait for your hands to dry, and then add your moisturizer. You can also use a moisturizing sanitizer. However, some moisturizing sanitizers may contain a lower alcohol level and may not be as effective in blocking germs. 

 

Lightly pat your skin dry with a clean towel, instead of rubbing it. You can also let your hands air dry. Leave your skin slightly damp so it can absorb your moisturizer. Moist skin is better than dry skin because your moisturizer acts as a sealant, sealing in the water left on your hands. 

 

When it comes to moisturizers, use ointments and creams, as opposed to lotions. Lotions are thinner in consistency and contain a higher water content, which causes moisture to escape from the skin. Look for creams and ointments that contain mineral oil, petroleum, glycerin, hyaluronic acid, olive or jojoba oil, and shea butter. Moisturizers that come in tubes are thicker, making them better for your skin than those that come in pumps. Keep one with you to help prevent your hands from drying.

 

Take it a step further. After applying a moisturizer, cover your hands with cotton gloves to increase absorption. You can leave them on for a few minutes or sleep with them overnight. It’s also helpful to wear gloves if you live in colder climates to protect them from harsh, windy weather. Lastly, before bed, make sure you apply a thick moisturizer to your hands. Using a humidifier at night can also help because it will increase moisture in the air. 

For more information on healthy beautiful hands, please call Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center at 561-776-7041 or visit them online at gardensdermatology.com.

 
By contactus@gardensdermatology.com
December 22, 2020
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Stress and your skin

Stress is a natural reaction to life experiences. People encounter stressful situations daily, from working to taking care of their families to sitting in traffic to paying bills. However, when you are overwhelmed with stress, it can take a toll on your body’s systems. Your skin, unfortunately, is no exception.

When your brain senses a threat, it sends a message to your adrenal glands to release the hormones cortisol and adrenaline. These hormones increase your heart rate and send blood to your muscles and organs. Stress can be a good thing in some situations because it helps you act quickly or deal with specific problems. On the other hand, when your body fires those hormones regularly, it turns into chronic stress and becomes too much for the body to handle.

When it comes to your skin, stress can show on your face. According to Dr. Steven Shapiro at Gardens Dermatology, lines and wrinkles can form from frowning, tensing your facial muscles, and loss of elasticity due to protein changes. You may develop bad habits like clenching your jaw, grinding your teeth, or biting your lips. These habits can alter your appearance. Highly stressed individuals may experience sleep deprivation and develop bags under their eyes. People who have different skin conditions may see an increase in their severity when they are tense.

You’ve probably heard someone say their face is breaking out because they’re stressed. Stress can make you oilier, which could lead to acne breakouts. When the body is consistently releasing cortisol and adrenaline, excessive amounts of sebum can clog your pores leading to acne flare-ups. Stress can also weaken your immune system and cause an imbalance of bacteria growth in your gut. This chain reaction can trigger internal inflammation that can cause outbreaks of psoriasis, eczema, and dermatitis.

Have you ever felt hot or sweaty out of nowhere during an uncomfortable situation? When your body senses a threat, the release of adrenaline produces more sweat to keep it cool. This reaction leads to water loss, and if you don’t rehydrate, your skin will dry out. For people with naturally dry skin, chronic stress can make them more prone to other conditions, like rashes.

Stress is a part of life, so what can you do to keep it from taking its toll on your skin? The experts at Gardens Dermatology recommend the following habits:

  • Wash your face with a gentle cleanser and warm water at least twice a day and after sweating.
  • Moisturize according to your skin type: moisture-free moisturizer or retinol serum for oily skin, antioxidant moisturizer for normal skin, a hydrating moisturizer for dry or aging skin, a lightweight moisturizer for combination skin, and a scent-free moisturizer for sensitive skin.
  • Get at least seven to nine hours of sleep every night. If you wake up throughout the night, take a 30-minute nap during the day.
  • Keep up with your water intake. Avoid drinks that are high in sugar and cause dehydration.
  • Eat a healthy diet rich in leafy greens, fruits, and whole grains.
  • Exercise at least three to five times a week.
  • Make time to do something relaxing, like watching a movie, seeing or talking to your family or friends, and reading.
  • If necessary, seek professional help.

For more information on managing the effects of stress your skin, please call Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center at 561-776-7041 or visit them online at gardensdermatology.com.

 

By contactus@gardensdermatology.com
December 15, 2020
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Stress and your skin...

Click on link for more: https://cbs12.com/features/health-watch/gardens-dermatology/stress-and-your-skin

Stress is a natural reaction to life experiences. People encounter stressful situations daily, from working to taking care of their families to sitting in traffic to paying bills. However, when you are overwhelmed with stress, it can take a toll on your body's systems. Your skin, unfortunately, is no exception.

When your brain senses a threat, it sends a message to your adrenal glands to release the hormones cortisol and adrenaline. These hormones increase your heart rate and send blood to your muscles and organs. Stress can be a good thing in some situations because it helps you act quickly or deal with specific problems. On the other hand, when your body fires those hormones regularly, it turns into chronic stress and becomes too much for the body to handle.

When it comes to your skin, stress can show on your face. According to Dr. Steven Shapiro at Gardens Dermatology, lines and wrinkles can form from frowning, tensing your facial muscles, and loss of elasticity due to protein changes. You may develop bad habits like clenching your jaw, grinding your teeth, or biting your lips. These habits can alter your appearance. Highly stressed individuals may experience sleep deprivation and develop bags under their eyes. People who have different skin conditions may see an increase in their severity when they are tense.

You've probably heard someone say their face is breaking out because they're stressed. Stress can make you oilier, which could lead to acne breakouts. When the body is consistently releasing cortisol and adrenaline, excessive amounts of sebum can clog your pores leading to acne flare-ups. Stress can also weaken your immune system and cause an imbalance of bacteria growth in your gut. This chain reaction can trigger internal inflammation that can cause outbreaks of psoriasis, eczema, and dermatitis.

Have you ever felt hot or sweaty out of nowhere during an uncomfortable situation? When your body senses a threat, the release of adrenaline produces more sweat to keep it cool. This reaction leads to water loss, and if you don't rehydrate, your skin will dry out. For people with naturally dry skin, chronic stress can make them more prone to other conditions, like rashes.

Stress is a part of life, so what can you do to keep it from taking its toll on your skin? The experts at Gardens Dermatology recommend the following habits:

  • Wash your face as soon as possible after sweating.
  • Moisturize according to your skin type: oil absorbing moisturizer and retinol for oily skin, antioxidant moisturizer for normal skin, a hydrating moisturizer for dry or aging skin, a lightweight moisturizer for combination skin, and a scent-free moisturizer for sensitive skin.
  • Get at least seven to nine hours of sleep every night. If you wake up throughout the night, take a 30-minute nap during the day.
  • Keep up with your water intake. Avoid drinks that are high in sugar and cause dehydration.
  • Eat a healthy diet rich in leafy greens, fruits, and whole grains.
  • Exercise at least three to five times a week.
  • Make time to do something relaxing, like watching a movie, seeing or talking to your family or friends, and reading.
  • If necessary, seek professional help.

 

For more information on managing the effects of stress your skin, please call Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center at 561-776-7041 or visit them online at gardensdermatology.com.

By contactus@gardensdermatology.com
November 13, 2020
Category: Uncategorized
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Patches, Redness and Flare-Ups, Oh My! Rosacea vs. Psoriasis

Rosacea and psoriasis are two of the most common skin conditions that plague Americans, but not many can identify the differing tell-tale signs between the two.

Here's how you can spot the signs, understand your diagnosis, and what you can do to relieve your symptoms.

Psoriasis can affect your entire body, resulting in itchy, red, patches.

According to Gardens Dermatology, psoriasis is a chronic, long-lasting disease that develops when a person's immune system sends faulty signals to the skin cells, prompting them to multiply. New skin cells form within days as opposed to weeks. Instead of shedding, the cells pile up on the skin's surface creating patches of psoriasis to appear. This disease is not contagious, so you cannot get it by touching a person who has it. Psoriasis can run in families but can happen in individuals without a family member with the disease.

There are different types of psoriasis, including:

Some people have more than one type or can develop into other forms. Current studies show that more than eight million Americans have this skin disease. The condition can start at any age but it is more common that it starts in adults.

Roughly 25% to 30% of people with psoriasis, may develop psoriatic arthritis, another form of the skin condition, which causes inflammation and swelling in the joints. Some psoriasis arthritis symptoms include a swollen finger or toe, nail separating from nail bed, lower back pain, heel pain, and stiffness when you wake up or sit for hours. There are treatment options to help ease symptoms or prevent further damage—including physical therapy, arthritis-friendly, exercise, and medication.

While there is currently no cure for psoriasis, you can alleviate itching, cracking and bleeding, by taking care of your skin. The dermatologists at Gardens Dermatology recommend:

  • Avoid excessive sun exposure.
  • Avoid skin injuries like bug bites and cuts.
  • Try not to scratch, as scratching can worsen your condition.
  • Here are some ways to relieve itching: applying a cold compress or ice pack, take medication as directed by your doctor, and moisturize daily, in the morning and evening before bed.

In contrast to psoriasis, rosacea is contained to the face and results in flushing of the skin and acne, like pimples and bumps.

Rosacea is a common skin ailment that begins with a tendency to blush or flush more than others, according to Gardens Dermatology. The redness slowly spreads from the nose and cheeks to the forehead and chin. In some people, it can reach the chest, back and remain red at all times. Due to the number of symptoms, there are four subtypes:

  • Erythematotelangiectatic rosacea—redness, flushing, and visible blood vessels.
  • Papulopustular rosacea—redness, swelling, and acne-like breakouts.
  • Phymatous rosacea—thick skin with a bumpy texture
  • Ocular rosacea—red and irritated eyes or swollen eyelids. Severe cases may require you to see an ophthalmologist.

 

The American Academy of Dermatology Association found that 16 million Americans have rosacea. It's most common in individuals ages 30 and 60 with fair skin, blonde hair, and blue eyes. Women experiencing menopause are also likely to develop rosacea. While women likely to get rosacea, men are likely to have severe cases. People with a family history of rosacea may inherit the genes of the disease.

Many people living with this skin condition say it affects their quality of life. They express having feelings of frustration, embarrassment, worry, depression, and low self-esteem. It also impacts the work and personal lives of many. There is no cure, but there are treatments to prevent rosacea from worsening. Some of these options include medication, antibiotics and laser or light procedures. You can also decrease its severity by avoiding hot showers, sweating, and heat which may increase blood flow to the affected area of the face and wearing sunscreen during the day and applying an emollient to help repair skin.

For more information on what causes acne and how to improve your skin, please call Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center at 561-776-7041 or visit them online at gardensdermatology.com.

 

https://cbs12.com/features/health-watch/gardens-dermatology/patches-redness-and-flare-ups-oh-my-rosacea-vs-psoriasis

By contactus@gardensdermatology.com
August 20, 2020
Category: Uncategorized
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Tips for researching skin care procedures online

People are always looking online for procedures to improve the look and health of their skin. Many learn about new procedures talking to friends, scrolling social media, and researching them on websites.  If you are feeling self-conscious about different skin issues, like wrinkles, and wondering if there is a way to change them. The answer is yes, but there are so many treatment options, how would you know where to start? Dr. Steven Shapiro, with Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center in Palm Beach Gardens, has an easy solution.

People tend to focus on which procedures can help them with their problems, but that method might not be the right one. Instead, Dr. Shapiro suggests starting with the issue that is bothering you and then consult your Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center board certified provider to discuss it. Your provider can perform a proper diagnosis and offer the best treatment options for you.

Treatments for common issues like wrinkles and frown lines are not always as black and white as they sound. For example, according to Dr. Shapiro, a wrinkle in motion and a wrinkle at rest are two different things that may require more than one procedure. For treatment options, providers may lean towards Botox for wrinkles in motion and fillers for wrinkles at rest.

According to Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center providers, Botox and Dysport injections treat wrinkles caused by facial expressions in both men and women. The injections reduce the appearance of wrinkles by relaxing muscles in the face, leading to smoother skin. Some of the target areas are forehead wrinkles, crow’s feet around the eyes, lines between the eyebrows, lip lines, and neck bands. These procedures are short and require little to no downtime. Patients can expect to see significant results after five to ten days. 

Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center providers define dermal fillers as injections placed into the facial tissue to correct moderate to severe facial wrinkles and folds. Dermal fillers target cheeks, lines, and lips. This minimally invasive procedure provides dramatic results by plumping thin lips, enhancing shallow contours, softening facial creases, removing wrinkles, and improving the appearance of recessed scars. Fillers can also reverse the effects of aging and sun exposure.

There are several filler procedures designed to target specific areas. Some of these include Juvederm and Restylane. Please consult your Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center provider to determine which option is best for you and your skin.

For more information on what causes acne and how to improve your skin, please call Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center at 561-776-7041 or visit them online at gardensdermatology.com.

 





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