Get In With Your Skin Gardens Dermatology Esthetic Blog
By contactus@gardensdermatology.com
March 29, 2021
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Breaking away from acne

Acne is the most common skin condition in the U.S. that can affect anyone at any age, even babies. Some people have it worse than others. Some have lived with it their entire lives. Acne can be very frustrating for many because it affects their day-to-day life.

This skin condition begins with a blocked hair follicle. Normally, dead skin cells rise to the surface and sheds. When the follicle is blocked, the cells become trapped causing a build-up of dead skin, excess oil, and bacteria. The skin becomes inflamed creating acne.

Other causes include diet, stress, hormones, exfoliating, or picking and popping pimples. Hormonal changes in teenagers and pregnant women may cause flare-ups. Certain medications like birth control can also play a role. A diet that is high in refined sugar and carbs can lead to acne. Parents who had acne can pass it on to their children.

Acne doesn’t just affect the face. It can also appear on the neck, chest, back, upper arms, shoulders, and buttocks. If you thought acne is just pimples, think again. It has many forms—blackheads, whiteheads, papules, cysts, and nodules.

According to Gardens Dermatology, one of the common myths people hear about acne is to let it run its course. However, leaving it untreated can lead to dark spots and permanent scars. In some cases, people may develop depression and low self-esteem issues because they are not happy with their appearance.

Although acne can be annoying, it is treatable. Speak with your dermatologist before starting new products. A dermatologist can examine your condition, get to the root of the issue, and develop a plan that will help you get back to clear skin.

“It’s not one size fits all with acne treatment. Decisions in treatment are based on many factors,” says Dr. Savannah Ray, PA-C.

Different medications can attack acne at different stages. Treatments are based on a person’s condition, skin type, acne type, and overall goals for healthy skin.

  • Some mild cases of acne (whiteheads, blackheads, and pimples) can be treated without a prescription by using products that contain benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid.
  • Other treatments include topical medications that contain a retinoid or antibiotics to help kill bacteria or reduce oil.
  • For red, swollen types of acne, dermatologists may suggest an internal medication that works within the body to treat cysts and nodules. They may prescribe an antibiotic, Isotretinoin, or medicines that work on hormones.

Some procedures can help treat acne:

Acne can be frustrating, but with the right treatment, you can rid yourself of even the most stubborn of acne.

For more information on what causes acne and how to improve your skin, please call Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center at 561-776-7041 or visit them online at gardensdermatology.com.

 

By contactus@gardensdermatology.com
February 02, 2021
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Your Winter Skin Survival Guide

South Floridians may not have to deal with months of snow and freezing temperatures, but those rare cold days can leave your skin craving moisture. Cold, dry conditions can cause dry, cracked skin or worsen skin-related conditions. A person's age, health, and time spent outdoors can also play a role. No one enjoys the feeling of dryness, so here is what you can do to keep your skin moisturized.

According to Dr. Susan Mata at Gardens Dermatology, some signs and symptoms include tight skin after showering, bathing or swimming, rough skin, itching, flaking, scaling, or peelings, fine lines or cracks, ashy skin, redness, and cracks that bleed. Thankfully, dry skin is an issue that you can correct at home.

When it's cold outside, a long hot shower sounds ideal, but it can be detrimental to your skin. Switch to warmer showers and keep them short, no more than five to ten minutes. Wash your face with warm water too. Use a gentle, fragrance-free cleanser. Apply enough to clean but not enough to create a thick lather. Blot your skin with a towel. Keep the door closed to help increase moisture in the air.

After drying, apply your moisturizer. Ointments and creams work better than lotions to trap existing moisture into your skin. Slather it onto your skin shortly after drying to help seal it in. Look for ingredients like lactic acid, hyaluronic acid, dimethicone, glycerin, lanolin, mineral oil, and petrolatum. If your skin is extra dry, add a few drops of olive, jojoba, coconut, or vitamin E oil to your cleanser or moisturizer. Or, add some to your bathwater.

While some products contain active ingredients, they also have preservatives, acids, fragrances, alcohols, and dyes that can be drying or cause allergic reactions. These ingredients can also be harmful to sensitive skin. Sometimes, keeping it simple is the best approach.

For a holistic alternative, look for ingredients like shea butter and honey. Avocado, castor, and lavender oils are perfect for soothing dry skin, but they may be irritating if you have acne-prone skin, so conduct a patch test before using. Coconut oil is excellent for eczema and people who don't have acne-skin. Aloe Vera has both healing and moisturizing properties.

Keep moisture in the air by using a humidifier during the day and at night while you sleep. Keep in mind that running the heater in our home and car dehydrates the skin, so try to keep moisture in the air whenever possible.

If you are still struggling with dry skin, speak to your dermatologist.

For more information on healthy, moisturized skin, please call Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center at 561-776-7041 or visit them online at gardensdermatology.com.

For more information visit:

https://cbs12.com/features/health-watch/gardens-dermatology/your-winter-skin-survival-guide

By contactus@gardensdermatology.com
January 05, 2021
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Taking care of your hands during the pandemic

 

Proper handwashing is an essential. You’ve been washing your hands more this year to keep yourself free of germs and bacteria. However, you may have noticed your hands are dryer than usual. While frequent handwashing is one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of infections, it can also cause dryness and chapped skin, early wrinkles, rashes, and other skin-related issues. People who have pre-existing skin conditions, like eczema, are at risk of developing more severe symptoms.

 

As recently mentioned by Harvard Health Publishing, when your skin is intact, it serves as a protective barrier. When the top layer is exposed to hot water, oil stripping soaps and drying alcohol found in some hand sanitizers can break down the compounds and healthy fatty acids. The result is an impaired barrier, leading to irritation, discomfort, cracks or breaks in the skin, and increased risk of infection. 

 

According to the American Academy of Dermatology Association, dry skin increases your chances of picking up germs. Moisturized skin can better protect you because of the natural oils and wax it holds. When washing your hands or using sanitizer, it’s essential to follow-up with a moisturizer to prevent excess dryness. 

 

Here are some ways to keep your hands clean, healthy, and moisturized while frequently washing.

 

Wash with cool, lukewarm, or warm water. Hot water can dry your skin out because it strips away natural oils.  You can use a moisturizing cleanser to help prevent dryness.  Dr. Michael Borenstein at Gardens Dermatology recommends using a mild, fragrance-free soap if you have sensitive skin, eczema, or other related issues. Those who prefer natural or organic ingredients, look for soaps containing shea butter, avocado oil, coconut oil, or jojoba oil. 

 

If you cannot wash your hands as frequently, keep an alcohol-based (60% ethanol or 70% isopropanol alcohol) sanitizer available. After applying the sanitizer, wait for your hands to dry, and then add your moisturizer. You can also use a moisturizing sanitizer. However, some moisturizing sanitizers may contain a lower alcohol level and may not be as effective in blocking germs. 

 

Lightly pat your skin dry with a clean towel, instead of rubbing it. You can also let your hands air dry. Leave your skin slightly damp so it can absorb your moisturizer. Moist skin is better than dry skin because your moisturizer acts as a sealant, sealing in the water left on your hands. 

 

When it comes to moisturizers, use ointments and creams, as opposed to lotions. Lotions are thinner in consistency and contain a higher water content, which causes moisture to escape from the skin. Look for creams and ointments that contain mineral oil, petroleum, glycerin, hyaluronic acid, olive or jojoba oil, and shea butter. Moisturizers that come in tubes are thicker, making them better for your skin than those that come in pumps. Keep one with you to help prevent your hands from drying.

 

Take it a step further. After applying a moisturizer, cover your hands with cotton gloves to increase absorption. You can leave them on for a few minutes or sleep with them overnight. It’s also helpful to wear gloves if you live in colder climates to protect them from harsh, windy weather. Lastly, before bed, make sure you apply a thick moisturizer to your hands. Using a humidifier at night can also help because it will increase moisture in the air. 

For more information on healthy beautiful hands, please call Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center at 561-776-7041 or visit them online at gardensdermatology.com.

 
By contactus@gardensdermatology.com
December 22, 2020
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Stress and your skin

Stress is a natural reaction to life experiences. People encounter stressful situations daily, from working to taking care of their families to sitting in traffic to paying bills. However, when you are overwhelmed with stress, it can take a toll on your body’s systems. Your skin, unfortunately, is no exception.

When your brain senses a threat, it sends a message to your adrenal glands to release the hormones cortisol and adrenaline. These hormones increase your heart rate and send blood to your muscles and organs. Stress can be a good thing in some situations because it helps you act quickly or deal with specific problems. On the other hand, when your body fires those hormones regularly, it turns into chronic stress and becomes too much for the body to handle.

When it comes to your skin, stress can show on your face. According to Dr. Steven Shapiro at Gardens Dermatology, lines and wrinkles can form from frowning, tensing your facial muscles, and loss of elasticity due to protein changes. You may develop bad habits like clenching your jaw, grinding your teeth, or biting your lips. These habits can alter your appearance. Highly stressed individuals may experience sleep deprivation and develop bags under their eyes. People who have different skin conditions may see an increase in their severity when they are tense.

You’ve probably heard someone say their face is breaking out because they’re stressed. Stress can make you oilier, which could lead to acne breakouts. When the body is consistently releasing cortisol and adrenaline, excessive amounts of sebum can clog your pores leading to acne flare-ups. Stress can also weaken your immune system and cause an imbalance of bacteria growth in your gut. This chain reaction can trigger internal inflammation that can cause outbreaks of psoriasis, eczema, and dermatitis.

Have you ever felt hot or sweaty out of nowhere during an uncomfortable situation? When your body senses a threat, the release of adrenaline produces more sweat to keep it cool. This reaction leads to water loss, and if you don’t rehydrate, your skin will dry out. For people with naturally dry skin, chronic stress can make them more prone to other conditions, like rashes.

Stress is a part of life, so what can you do to keep it from taking its toll on your skin? The experts at Gardens Dermatology recommend the following habits:

  • Wash your face with a gentle cleanser and warm water at least twice a day and after sweating.
  • Moisturize according to your skin type: moisture-free moisturizer or retinol serum for oily skin, antioxidant moisturizer for normal skin, a hydrating moisturizer for dry or aging skin, a lightweight moisturizer for combination skin, and a scent-free moisturizer for sensitive skin.
  • Get at least seven to nine hours of sleep every night. If you wake up throughout the night, take a 30-minute nap during the day.
  • Keep up with your water intake. Avoid drinks that are high in sugar and cause dehydration.
  • Eat a healthy diet rich in leafy greens, fruits, and whole grains.
  • Exercise at least three to five times a week.
  • Make time to do something relaxing, like watching a movie, seeing or talking to your family or friends, and reading.
  • If necessary, seek professional help.

For more information on managing the effects of stress your skin, please call Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center at 561-776-7041 or visit them online at gardensdermatology.com.

 

By contactus@gardensdermatology.com
December 15, 2020
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Stress and your skin...

Click on link for more: https://cbs12.com/features/health-watch/gardens-dermatology/stress-and-your-skin

Stress is a natural reaction to life experiences. People encounter stressful situations daily, from working to taking care of their families to sitting in traffic to paying bills. However, when you are overwhelmed with stress, it can take a toll on your body's systems. Your skin, unfortunately, is no exception.

When your brain senses a threat, it sends a message to your adrenal glands to release the hormones cortisol and adrenaline. These hormones increase your heart rate and send blood to your muscles and organs. Stress can be a good thing in some situations because it helps you act quickly or deal with specific problems. On the other hand, when your body fires those hormones regularly, it turns into chronic stress and becomes too much for the body to handle.

When it comes to your skin, stress can show on your face. According to Dr. Steven Shapiro at Gardens Dermatology, lines and wrinkles can form from frowning, tensing your facial muscles, and loss of elasticity due to protein changes. You may develop bad habits like clenching your jaw, grinding your teeth, or biting your lips. These habits can alter your appearance. Highly stressed individuals may experience sleep deprivation and develop bags under their eyes. People who have different skin conditions may see an increase in their severity when they are tense.

You've probably heard someone say their face is breaking out because they're stressed. Stress can make you oilier, which could lead to acne breakouts. When the body is consistently releasing cortisol and adrenaline, excessive amounts of sebum can clog your pores leading to acne flare-ups. Stress can also weaken your immune system and cause an imbalance of bacteria growth in your gut. This chain reaction can trigger internal inflammation that can cause outbreaks of psoriasis, eczema, and dermatitis.

Have you ever felt hot or sweaty out of nowhere during an uncomfortable situation? When your body senses a threat, the release of adrenaline produces more sweat to keep it cool. This reaction leads to water loss, and if you don't rehydrate, your skin will dry out. For people with naturally dry skin, chronic stress can make them more prone to other conditions, like rashes.

Stress is a part of life, so what can you do to keep it from taking its toll on your skin? The experts at Gardens Dermatology recommend the following habits:

  • Wash your face as soon as possible after sweating.
  • Moisturize according to your skin type: oil absorbing moisturizer and retinol for oily skin, antioxidant moisturizer for normal skin, a hydrating moisturizer for dry or aging skin, a lightweight moisturizer for combination skin, and a scent-free moisturizer for sensitive skin.
  • Get at least seven to nine hours of sleep every night. If you wake up throughout the night, take a 30-minute nap during the day.
  • Keep up with your water intake. Avoid drinks that are high in sugar and cause dehydration.
  • Eat a healthy diet rich in leafy greens, fruits, and whole grains.
  • Exercise at least three to five times a week.
  • Make time to do something relaxing, like watching a movie, seeing or talking to your family or friends, and reading.
  • If necessary, seek professional help.

 

For more information on managing the effects of stress your skin, please call Gardens Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery Center at 561-776-7041 or visit them online at gardensdermatology.com.





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